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Posts tagged: queer Chican@

Signal Boost: TLGBQ Latin@ Research

Volunteer for a Research Study!

Violence/Harm and Transgender, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Latina & Latino Experiences

The Purpose

The purpose of this research project is to better understand the experiences of Latin@ transgender, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer people who experience harm/violence in their lives because of who they are.  The study seeks to understand what harm/violence people have encountered throughout their life, when and why they have felt safer or affirmed, and their opinions about harm/violence in society.

What You Are Volunteering For?

A confidential, audio recorded three (3) hour interview. A $25.00 VISA gift card will be given to all participants who complete the interview.

Where Is The Interview?

At a safe location the volunteer chooses.

Am I Qualified To Volunteer?

If you can answer “Yes” to all of the following questions, then you are able to volunteer:

1)    Are you of Latin American descent?

2)    Are you transgender, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or queer?

3)    Have you experienced some type of harm/violence because of who you are?

4)    Are you at least 18 years old?

5)    Do you currently live in the state of Texas?

6)    If an immigrant, have you lived in the United States for at least five (5) years?

This study has been approved by The University of Texas at Austin Institutional Review Board.

If you are interested in volunteering to be interviewed and would like more information, please contact David Glisch-Sánchez by e-mail at glisch.sanchez@gmail.com




¡Participe en un estudio de investigación!

Las experiencias de violencia en las vidas de latinas y latinos transgénero, lesbiana, gay, o bisexual.

Objetivo

El propósito de esta investigación es entender las experiencias de las latinas y los latinos transgénero, lesbiana, gay, o bisexual que han experimentado daño/violencia en sus vidas.  La investigación quiere documentar los tipos de daño/violencia que las personas han experimentado durante toda la vida, cuando y porque han sentido más seguro ó afirmado, y sus opiniones sobre el daño y la violencia que hay en la sociedad.

¿Qué hará Ud. si desea participar en ésta investigación?

Participar en una entrevista que será confidencial y grabado por tres (3) horas. Cada persona que termina la entrevista recibirá una VISA tarjeta de regalo que vale $25.00.

¿Dónde será la entrevista?

En un lugar seguro y privado que el voluntario o la voluntaria prefiera y escoja.

¿Califico yo para el estudio?

Si Ud. contesta con un “Sí” a las siguientes preguntas, puede participar en el estudio:

1)    ¿Tiene Ud. herencia latinoamericana?

2)    ¿Es Ud. transgénero, lesbiana, gay o bisexual?

3)    ¿Ha experimentado Ud. violencia u otro tipo de daño porque ser quien es?

4)    ¿Tiene Ud. a lo menos 18 años?

5)    ¿Vive Ud. en el estado de Texas?

6)    Si es inmigrante, ¿ha vivido Ud. en los Estados Unidos a lo menos 5 años?

Esté proyecto ha sido aprobado por la Comisión de Revisión Institucional de la Universidad de Tejas en Austin.

Si esta Ud. Interesada(o) a participar en la entrevista y desea más información, por favor envie un mensaje a David Glisch-Sánchez por e-mail a glisch.sanchez@gmail.com


Please Re-Blog!

¡Por favor, re-blog!

Violence is when there is no awareness of our inner soul, that the person next to us is also a sacred soul. It is when we make that decision to use whatever power we have…to injure another soul.


-Maria Elena Martinez, Local Council member, Alma de Mujer

This is one of my favorite definitions of violence that I have received in the many interviews I have done. It is simple and elastic; and by that I mean it is clear and to the point while resisting the impulse to be rigid in the criteria of what is and is not violence.  Many people’s own definition of violence, and certainly the definition of violence in the law, creates a very narrow idea of what violence is. The problem then becomes that many people’s, many groups’ experience of violence and harm because of racism, patriarchy, transphobia, homophobia, class exploitation, xenophobia, and ableism do not get recognized in the many forms they often come. Racist violence does not always come in the form of a lynching. Misogynistic violence does not always manifest in rape. Transphobic and homophobic violence does not always look like street harassment.

Maria Elena Martinez’s definition creates a space where we might recognize and acknowledge the many forms of harm a person can encounter.  Whatever language you use: soul, spirit, divine spark, or humanity; Martinez’s comment asks us to consider what institutional, group, and individual actions that denies or minimizes a person’s or group’s sacredness or humanity we may be witness to or participating in. At the very least, her quote asks us to reflect on how we come to define violence and what effect that might have on other folks.

"In this country, lesbianism is a poverty-as is being brown, as is being a woman, as is being just plain poor. The danger lies in ranking the oppressions. The danger lies in failing to acknowledge the specificity of the oppression. The danger lies in attempting to deal with oppression purely from a theoretical base. Without an emotional, heartfelt grappling with the source of our own oppression, without naming the enemy within ourselves and outside of us, no authentic, non-hierarchical connection among oppressed groups can take place." 
—Cherríe Moraga, “La Güera” in This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color 

"In this country, lesbianism is a poverty-as is being brown, as is being a woman, as is being just plain poor. The danger lies in ranking the oppressions. The danger lies in failing to acknowledge the specificity of the oppression. The danger lies in attempting to deal with oppression purely from a theoretical base. Without an emotional, heartfelt grappling with the source of our own oppression, without naming the enemy within ourselves and outside of us, no authentic, non-hierarchical connection among oppressed groups can take place." 

—Cherríe Moraga, “La Güera” in This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color 

Didn’t get a chance to see the Queer Latin@ Monologues (cuz I live in TX), but I wanted to share yet another example of Queer Latin@s doing it for ourselves and getting our stories out there in whatever format, vehicle, and medium we can!

This production was a collaboration between DeColores Queer Orange County and Breath of Fire Latina Theater Ensemble. Props to them for doing their thing!

Didn’t get a chance to see the Queer Latin@ Monologues (cuz I live in TX), but I wanted to share yet another example of Queer Latin@s doing it for ourselves and getting our stories out there in whatever format, vehicle, and medium we can!

This production was a collaboration between DeColores Queer Orange County and Breath of Fire Latina Theater Ensemble. Props to them for doing their thing!

UNSUNG SHEROES/HEROÍNAS

Victoria Cruz is a transgender boriqua from the island but has lived in New York City since the age of 4.  In 1997, Victoria Cruz was a victim and is a survivor of sexual assault and harassment by four female co-workers.  After refusing to remain silent and hold her attackers responsible for their violent actions, she has dedicated her life to helping other TLGBQ folks, especially TLGBQ people of color survive and thrive despite their experiences with domestic violence, police brutality, and/or sexual violence.  Victoria Cruz works for the New York Anti-Violence Project and was recognized as one of the 2012 recipients of the Justice Department’s National Crime Victim Service Award.

I/We honor her part and effort en la lucha for creating a more just and safe world.  We give thanks for the love and light she brings into this world that often does not contain enough of either.

UNSUNG SHEROES/HEROÍNAS


Victoria Cruz is a transgender boriqua from the island but has lived in New York City since the age of 4.  In 1997, Victoria Cruz was a victim and is a survivor of sexual assault and harassment by four female co-workers.  After refusing to remain silent and hold her attackers responsible for their violent actions, she has dedicated her life to helping other TLGBQ folks, especially TLGBQ people of color survive and thrive despite their experiences with domestic violence, police brutality, and/or sexual violence.  Victoria Cruz works for the New York Anti-Violence Project and was recognized as one of the 2012 recipients of the Justice Department’s National Crime Victim Service Award.

I/We honor her part and effort en la lucha for creating a more just and safe world.  We give thanks for the love and light she brings into this world that often does not contain enough of either.